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30 today so we asked for your best '80s movie scenes. future" some good ones for me. thanks for playing today. "morning joe" starts right now. number 13, alex rodriguez. [ booing ] >> popped up, left field. diving is wells, he can't make the play and a-rod gets a single ins his first at-bat. >> i don't think there's a well in any of this situation. i just hope that there's a happy
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ending somewhere in there. >> he just loves the game. >> oh, yes he does. >> he played for free. he respects the game. >> he does. >> if by free you mean $270 million -- >> you know what, after talking to an 8-year-old sitting next to me at dinner last night, i understand what's wrong with all of this. it was exactly what i thought. he cheated. good morning, everyone. it's august 6th. welcome to "morning joe." with us former communications director for president george w. bush and senior adviser for the 2008 mccain presidential campaign, nicolle wallace. >> she's great. >> she's amazing. msnbc contributor mike barnicle. and in washington, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the -- >> amazon -- >> newly sold "washington post," wow, big news there, in your world, gene. we'll talk about that. >> no free shipping for you, mika. >> he's like the free shipping
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czar now. >> my goodness. none for me. >> all right. mike barnicle, this is like a big day -- >> mike, this is huge. >> this is. >> this is -- >> i was surprised. >> as willie was saying last night at the holiday inn, the plates are shifting under the media world and then we had a couple smokes and watched old reruns of "night of a thousand". >> you ran out of cigarettes before i got there. >> one pack talking about the globe, another pack -- >> the sale of the post as i'm sure gene will have more to say on this, it was stunning. >> it's an earthquake. >> stunning. >> but no family, few families who have owned newspapers have been better at it and more honorable at it than the graham family and i choose to think donnie graham and the waymouth aspect of the clan chose to sell the paper to save the paper. >> absolutely.
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>> from themselves. >> that's part of the story we have here. it's obviously one of the most iconic publications in the history of journalism and now "the washington post" has a new owner, jeff bezos guiding it from a start-up to an internet giant will take the reigns. he paid out $250 million for the "washington post" to do so. that's less than 1% of his $28 billion foreup. >> he's good. >> he's good. >> he's okay. >> couple other entities with it. the paper which helped topple president nixon with its reporting had been in the graham family for generations. some long-time employees openly wept at the surprise announcement, but chairman don graham said no one should be sad except for him. >> we knew we could keep "the post" alive and it could survive, but our aspirations for "the post" have always been higher than that and we went to
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see if we could find a buyer who would do a fair deal with "the washington post" company for our shareholders but also have opened the possibility of a better future for "the post." >> "the post" has faced the same head winds as other papers posting a $49 million loss in the first half of this year alone and its circulation has withered by nearly half from its peak in 1993. it is the latest in the string of big media deals where the value of internet and tv companies far outpaced newspapers. facebook bought instagram with its dozen employees for a billion dollars. al jazeera paid $500 million for current tv, the boston globe sold to red sox owner john henry for $70 million, a fraction of the $1.1 billion "the new york times" paid for it 20 years ago. it's just -- >> unbelievable. >> we saw a story in the paper yesterday, talking about barry
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diller investing in "newsweek" and everything and they walked away from it feeling like they made a bad mistake. john henry jumped in, fire sale is at the "boston globe" and now "the washington post," mike barnicle, i mean, you've been in the news business most of your life, is this the end or is -- are you going to see -- >> a new beginning. >> with bezos somebody who could do what barry diller couldn't? >> i think there are a couple aspects to it. print is an endangered species. the newspaper at the end of your driveway. that's an endangered species to some extent. the hopeful a aspect of this, both of these purchases, jeff bezos and john henry bring something to the industry that is not there right now and that is another view on where to take things in the future on the web with video streaming components to print and it could well be
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that what their view is could save and enrich the existing product. >> well, gene, this has happened before. this has been happening a couple years, though. rich guys, lots of money, sam goes in and says i'm going to buy the tribune and it's just a disaster for him, for him, for the company. and again, we can talk about barry diller who knew pretty quickly that he was, you know, - ds-- weekly magazines were going to be a challenge. what's going to be different here other than the fact that, of course, you write a column at "the washington post" which gives us all hope for journalism. >> well, thanks, joe. >> yeah. that's why i'm here. >> i hope that does play my own small part in this. >> of course. >> there are rich guys and there are rich guys. you know, jeff bezos i understand is a prince among men. >> of course he is. >> of course.
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>> as you well know. >> an heir. >> but he's also -- >> strikingly good looking. here here yes. >> he is a great disrupter. he reinvented publishering, reinvented retailing. and so i think he's -- >> gene, can you tell us something else great about him? tell us something great about your boss too. >> well -- >> he's good looking, great disrupter. >> i don't know our new boss but i do know that what mike said is right, that the graham family knew it could keep the post going, knew that we could survive indefinitely, but didn't know how to make us grow, didn't know how to -- what the next newspaper model was. >> right. >> and one thing i think you have to be encouraged about, is that, you know, the lion's share of "the post" revenue still comes from the print edition.
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like 70%. and jeff bezos is a guy who physically delivers stuff. >> yeah. >> so he understands that part of it as well as the internet part. so, you know, you have to be optimistic. yesterday people were literally stunned at the staff meeting, it was -- you could have heard a pin drop. it was amazing. >> lot of weeping going on? >> were people crying. >> some weeping. a lot of nostalgia, lot of hugs, but mostly just stunned surprise. it's a day that none of us thought would ever come, yet here we are. "the washington post" not owned by the graham family. >> mike and willie, too. >> just now. >> just oddly inappropriate times, unrelated to any announcements whatsoever. >> all right. >> can i ask gene, just quickly, what's the ratio inside that newsroom of disappointment to excitement about what jeff bezos might bring?
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you knew that the model that "the washington post" currently has is unsustainable as so many other newspapers have shown. what would you say talking to your friends at "the post" is the general feeling? >> well the general feeling is still shock. >> yeah. >> and since we're newspaper people, we will eventually get to the grousing part of it. so that, you know -- >> eventually? >> we will get there. >> excuse me, eugene. you guys are grousing right now. you just won't say it. come on. >> we don't -- we're not even capable of grousing at this point. >> too shocked. >> if you work in the newspaper business right now -- >> do grousing right now really quickly. rupert murdoch, everybody in town believes, owns "the new york post" which he loses 40, 50, $60 million a year because it's a hammer over people in new york city. all you to do is go to a dinner party in new york city to hear people like fretting and being nervous about what "the new york post" said and you sit back and
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go, that rupert murdoch, he is a smart guy and most everybody says, 50, $60 million that he invests that he loses, is worth it. so, you got this guy, one of the most powerful modern day industrialists in america, he buys the newspaper in the company town that determines how his business is regulated, how it's taxed, how his sector is -- i mean if you have so much money to burn, and you said, just a few years ago, that print is dead in 20 years in an interview, why in the world, why not go ahead and throw some money out there and control the newspaper that is the newspaper in a company town that is all about regulating his business it interests. >> well, you know, that's true, joe. and it's also true that "the washington post" is an iconic, worldwide brand.
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>> look, he will not grouse on tv. he will not do it. >> he can't grouse this early. it's -- >> "the washington post" for what it is. >> is it too soon yet? >> can i say one word about don graham. don is, i think, has never gotten the credit he is due as a publisher and as a person. he has been a wonderful -- it's been a wonderful experience working for him. and i think those of us who will be, you know, shifting over with the new company will always consider him -- consider him a friend and someone who really has a tremendous impact in this community, in journalism, just the highest standards a man of true honor and just a great guy. >> showing the front page as you say that. we have another story that is very interesting in terms of tv news and entertainment programming. decisions by nbc and cnn are
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creating a controversy within republican party with republicans and could impact the 2016 election. rnc chairman reince priebus has called on both networks to reconsider their decisions to shoot and air programs -- >> chris mathews interview with him. >> yes, that was, actually. >> chris had just gotten off the flight from africa, he was tired. >> very. sugar -- >> what he's doing is trying to get cnn and nbc to reconsider programs that they are doing about hillary clinton. if they proceed with their productions, he says he will not partner with the networks for debates during the next presidential election cycle. >> is this about a time that our party stands up and protects the party and our candidates from networks that are not in the business of promoting our party, they're not in the business of promoting our candidates, they're not in the business of anything doing but promoting the democratic party and i'm not going to sit around and watch
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this happen anymore. >> i don't necessarily disagree with him. nbc news has released a statement saying, quote, nbc news is completely independent of nbc entertainment and has no involvement in this project. i think at least if there's an entertainment division doesn't bother me so much. but if you're a news organization it's kind of a conflict. >> you said off the air mika it was as if they were trying to climb up something. >> i don't know. >> of the entire clinton organization. >> did i say that? >> you may have said it off the air. >> i don't remember. >> we republicans -- i mean, democrats never have to worry about this. even after he's dead, if you do a story about ronald reagan you have him around going, is this the nuclear button? nancy? nancy? >> oh, ronny. >> what's my name. and then nancy comes in with -- >> right here. >> he's -- >> actually i have to say, i saw
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the butler last night and the reagan retreated -- >> jane fonda is incredible. "the butler" is incredible. the rnc makes a good point but asking for the wrong things. we should ask for a seven-part mini series about the rise of chris christie. the problem isn't that media and entertainment is interested in politics. that's good. you know, i write novelles about the white house and cheer when politics becomes fodder for entertainment. the problem is, it is always -- >> oh, no -- >> one sided. >> it is always democrats that are always -- >> they definitely need to do -- >> and solidifies our paranoia they sit around at a cocktail party and they hatch up -- it really fuels -- >> we've lived in this community, these people are our friends. it's not paranoia. i mean they -- >> true. they are all at the same table. >> they adore and worship progressives and look at conservatives like us with -- >> i think they should do a jeb
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bush -- >> they like me and they like you -- >> air it continuously. >> it's a curiosity. they would never go, hey, let's do a mini series on scott walker. >> right. >> let me ask you a question -- >> or chris -- >> joe, no. >> let me ask you a question, you're the head of nbc entertainment. >> right. >> i come to you as a potential producer with two projects. i'm looking for a green light on one or the other. >> yeah. >> i have this one project, sort of the life and times of hillary clinton. kind of an interesting character. >> right. >> this other project is the one i really like, the life and times of mitt romney. >> right. >> which one are you going to green light? >> that's fine. but, you know, i don't -- i probably won't green light either of them. you know -- >> if you're a news organization -- >> mika and i have been in a lot of these pitch meetings, if somebody pitched me of a story of hillary clinton, i would say let me ask you this, is it going to be bright and shiny, going to talk about bill clinton's infidelities, the choices she had to make that may have had --
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are you going to leave the viewer asking the question did she really stay with him because she loved him or wanted to be u.s. senator and president of the united states? how far are we going to get into benghazi? going to show the ugly parts and pretty parts? if you're just going to do a glorification of hillary clinton, go. if at the end of this movie, you've got viewers going, i wonder if this was a good movie for hillary clinton or a bad movie for hillary clinton, then at that point, i would say, okay, well you know what, you know, let's develop the script and see what happens. i think we republicans, nicole, know how this ends. >> right. >> it's always a glorification and by the way, i'm speaking as someone that loves and respects hillary clinton. >> yeah. >> but you know what -- >> and i do. i have -- >> i'm sure hillary clinton doesn't want these movies made because she has, what you want as a politician, control. no control over how she's
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depicted. this does cement in the minds of the republicans and the rnc is playing the only card they have. this is the only leverage he has, to say these two outlets won't participate in republican primary debates and wise to do that. >> very. >> but these things happen all the time. it cements in the minds of the -- half the country that doesn't vote democratic, that doesn't embrace liberal media or doesn't trust the entertainment it cements in the mind the idea it's a grand conspiracy. >> i agree. i mean i really completely agree. >> just on the other side of this, and again, just to give the other side of it, though, even though nicole and i think -- are on the same -- and you are too, actually. >> i am. i think an entertainment division can do any movie they want, but when it's a news organization, they're going to have to do major documentary of a positive on a republican contender. >> it's all about ratings, though, willie, and who's had a more compelling story with the
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ups and downs than hillary clinton. she's really in a category -- >> it's very compelling. >> she's in a category by herself. nobody else on the political stage that you could do a movie that traces 30 years -- >> i think jeb bush is interesting and the family dynamics there. the brother that should have been president. >> listen, jeb's interesting, but jeb wasn't on the ways and means committee trying to impeach richard nixon. >> the family dynamics are fantastic. >> first lady in arkansas and ran around pushing school reform with the union bosses screaming at her, wasn't a first lady that tried to change american health care and -- i mean there's so much she went through. >> so what -- >> that's even pre-monica and all the real drama. >> i get obviously this causes some headaches for nbc news. we can be open about that. it is, nbc entertainment is completely separate from what we do. but, you know, listen, i think from everything i've read and
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none of us has seen a script it is going to be a personal story about hillary clinton. it's not going to tick through her political life. it probably will be about monica lewinsky, early years when she met bill clinton. it's her personal story and i don't think it's as much about politics. i think you will see some of the ugliness that's gone on her in life. >> gene, do you -- you'll remember this, gene, and mike barnicle will remember it too. 1983, i think it was, john glenn was going to be running for president as a democrat. the right stuff, which remains one of the greatest movies ever! god, i love that movie. sam shepard. >> he's great. >> greatest actor of all time for just that one role. sam shepard the greatest. oh, my gosh. it's unbelievable. >> chills just thinking about it. >> sam shepard riding through the horse going up -- anyway, there is a lot of talk that was going to help elect john glenn.
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>> yeah. >> and gene, at the end of the day it just did not -- >> at the end of the day we don't remember the glenn administration. so no, it didn't. this is a lot of to-do about something that's not going to really affect the political debate and i think mika draws the right distinction. i think there's a difference between an entertainment division doing whatever it wants to do, looking for the story, the drama, the narrative that's going to make a good tv show, and what a news division decides to do. you have to consider if you're going to cover politics you have to consider the political ramifications. i think mika has that right. but in the end, if you're going to do a story -- hillary clinton is an interesting person. she's had a pretty interesting life and i would think it's probably fodder for something that a lot of people might want to watch but not necessarily even people who like her
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politics. they might just be interested in the human story. >> so much to get to. really quick. >> given reince priebus's threat to cancel the debates having seen the last round of republican primary debates i would urge nbc entapement to expedite this process as quickly as possible. >> nicole, finishing up on your point -- if you're hillary clinton, who -- i mean she wants to control -- and for good reason -- >> all politicians do. she said some crazy crap flying around her so she likes to control what she can control. you don't want some screenwriter in hollywood doing this. i don't think this is a bargain for hillary either. >> listen you're -- you walk in the shoes of a politician and that which the public thinks is a great thing for you often isn't. so it's sort of like third-party advertising. if you can't control it you don't want it. >> so much to get to. >> let me just say, i never
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controlled any of my third-party advertising. >> no. >> it would have been illegal. >> never did that. go aheadp. >> just had to say that. >> willie, did you see the lady who freaked out on -- >> on what? >> lady freaked out on anthony weiner. >> we actually could have gotten to it with a couple of really great stories but -- >> we decided we were going to have willie and i -- a weiner-free a block and we did. >> this is not the day to do that. congressman peter king of new york joins us. also "the washington post" dan balz with his book on the 2012 election and the secretary of housing and urban development shaun donovan and tina brown reacts to the end end of "newsweek's" relationship with the daily beast. bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning. as far as travel goes this morning, we will have some problems out there. missouri is one of them.
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they've gotten drenched. four days in a row. flash flood warnings many areas. st. louis is okay right now and so is kansas city. now as we travel to the mid-atlantic, humidity has increased. we have rain out there. rained pretty good the last couple hours in eastern virginia including the richmond area. so far so good in washington, d.c. there is some rain up north there on 270. the forecast for the northeast today, we will see showers and storms, baltimore, d.c. to philly, but we are dry from philly northward. still one more nice day before a chance of showers and storms returns and as far as the airports go today, many big cities will have a chance of thunderstorms including st. louis, omaha and des moines. we could have minor travel delays at those airports. not expecting a horrible day if you're flying the friendly skies. lady liberty and new york harbor enjoying a beautiful morning. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪
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what a bum, is "the daily news." >> yeah. >> and then "the new york post," dam yankees. >> what's the point at this point for him to try to play if everyone is going to boo him, create a huge distraction. >> seriously, why is anthony weiner staying in the mayor's race? >> he gets to have moments like the one we're about to show you. >> the same thing with him. yesterday i think frank bruni tried to compare anthony weiner and ted cruz, i never really got that comparison -- >> did you? >> i did not get that. >> i do get the comparison between this guy and anthony
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weiner in that they're just holding on. they're just holding on. reminds me, though, of a don henley song, you know. boys of summer. saw a sticker on a cadillac, a little voice inside my head said don't look back. these guys don't need to look back. he needs to go, he just takes his human growth hormones, goes in his basement, got his weight set and just lifts weights. >> do it alone. >> get out of our way. >> detroit free press, one of the largest -- >> did you see that. >> publicly owned muse seems may be the next victim of detroit's bankruptcy filing. christies will appraise the value of all city-owned items at the detroit institute of art. this is sad. >> it is. >> featuring works from van gogh and deyeahgo rivera. the request came from creditors owed $18 billion. >> the city manager said of detroit, the city manager said
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they're lazy, stupid -- >> there's a lot of people now accusing everybody and trying to get in the way of the bankruptcy filing. >> the "usa today," last year, 1.35 million kids went to the e for sports-related injuries. a survey says that equates to a hospital visit every 25 seconds. the report estimates those injuries caused more than $900 million last year. >> from our parade of papers "seattle times" prolonged use of high blood pressure medication may lead to an increase risk for breast cancer for older women. in a survey of 2700 women, the rate of breast cancer doubled among those who used medication to treat hypertension for over it ten years. doctors warn the benefits of blood pressure medication outweigh the risk of cancer. >> you don't take blood pressure medication. >> i don't. >> no. i have high cholesterol. >> you have high cholesterol. >> yes. >> low blood pressure.
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>> correct. >> do you take lipitor? >> no. i started to like faint and stuff. i had side effects. now i'm going to get many letters from the people that run the company. >> you need to take it. >> i had side effects. side effects. >> i am a really healthy guy but i never take any medicine, right? >> you take lipitor. >> i check my cholesterol. it was 1,487 and i started to take lipitor and it's like 3 now. >> i did too. i had problems. >> my legs stopped working. >> it's like magical. >> what? >> you take lipitor, right? >> all day long. >> the stuff is like magical. >> i've had like -- my cholesterol is like 1,048 without it from the time i was 15 years old. >> i've dealt with the people who have reactions to talking about lipitor, the data is very few people like minute number of people have side effects. i had them. >> you need to take it again. mika is like 800, her cholesterol like 847. >> well it's just --
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>> what's that? >> half yours. >> half mine. >> i don't think people want to hear -- >> 3500 the other day. >> really? >> you know what, though, i do smoke a lot. so that increases my circulation. >> you and beyonce. okay. >> boom boom boom. just like a steam engine. going up against john henry -- i'm going to go over now, we're going to the politico desk with our own willie geist. >> joe has pulled pork and barbecue sauce running through his veins. >> lipitor gravy. >> lipitor gravy. politico, the chief white house correspondent -- >> i love it. >> mike allen has a look at playbook. good morning. >> good morning, willie. all right. let's talk about this quinnipiac survey, i want you to help walk us through a little bit. shows voters give new jersey governor chris christie the highest favorable rate org in this case they're calling highest temperature in the country. on a scale from 0 to 100 the first term republican rates 53.1 degrees, that barely edges out
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former secretary of state hillary clinton. senator elizabeth warren and president obama round out the top four. governor christie's position dips when only republicans are polled, drops to eighth behind the list of candidates behind the party's presidential nomination in 2016. first thing is first, what on earth is a temperature meter or whatever we're calling this? >> yes. so they call this the feeling thermometer. we're into feelings and we ask you how do you feel about these politicians. so 0 is stone cold. 100 is burning up. and we saw there the president coming in fourth. the most surprising number in that poll, you mentioned senator elizabeth warren, now the senior senator from massachusetts, coming in at number 3. the other thing that really struck us, how far christie fell when you ask just republicans, interestingly enough number one, when you ask just republicans, paul ryan, mitt romney's running mate and then rand paul, ted
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cruz, jeb bush, scott walker of wisconsin, all coming in before christie. that points to the governor's real challenge. he has this amazing national popularity and following, on the cover of "new york" magazine this week as governor hot head, but among republicans, we see there, he has work to do. but governor christie has done something very smart just in the last week here on the show, the clips on "morning joe," we've seen him starting to define himself apart from the tea party and so that's tough with republican voters, but that gives him a huge broad appeal. >> what do you make of the numbers? he has the best chance to beat hillary clinton in a hypothetical head-to-head. >> if he can win a national election it's great news. i would take it. take it to the bank and celebrate it and celebrate him. look, i think the best news in this poll is that people are paying as much attention to the republican field as the democrats. it helps cancel out any angst about any nbc mini series.
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>> do you think -- does the chris christie, is there a primary problem for him? we talk about the primary problem but mitt romney made it out of the primary, john mccain made it out, george w. bush. >> mike addresses this in today's "wall street journal" in the op-ed page the idea that conservatives, you know, ultraconservatives who sometimes struggle in their own primaries can magically transcend and win general elections is ridiculous. moderates, conservative, fiscal conservatives we want winners, chris christie reeks of momentum and winner-ness. >> i think you coined that. >> it's early enough. >> that's a good word. >> mike allen with a look at the politico playbook, thanks. >> go pop some lipitor. sounds good. >> join the party, baby. coming up, she thought she had won the race but she hadn't crossed the finish line and an unfortunate premature celebration. next on "morning joe." >> my gosh. you think washing your face is healthy.
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♪ alex rodriguez or a-rod has
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been suspended through the end of next season. >> 12 players got 50 game suspensions. a-rod is suspended for 211 games which is an odd number but 11 they calculated his batting average would have been without the drugs. >> mlb baseball suspended him a total of 211 games, otherwise known as what a single baseball game feels like. the league grew more suspicious last summer when rodriguez won his seventh tour de france. >> but he said he's going to appeal the decision and keep playing. even anthony weiner was like, man, some people just don't know when to quit. just get out. >> wow. >> long season for a-rod. >> he does not wreak of winner-ness. >> major league baseball cracked down. a-rod hit the hardest. the third baseman got a suspension of 211 games, which
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officially begins on thursday but a-rod will continue to play with the yankees while he appeals the league's decision. that will probably not come until after the season. you can expect if he stays healthy to see a-rod on the field for the season. at the game in chicago last night, a-rod met with a chorus of boos. he went 1 for 4, hit a single, a bloop single in his first at-bat. the yankees lost 8-1 to the terrible white sox. a-rod may be the headline in all this but major league baseball suspended 12 other players for 50 games each because of their alleged connection to biogenesis. >> they all took it, right? >> a-rod is the only one who fought it. mike, how do you see this ending? he's going to play the rest of the season, right? the arbitration hearing will be october or november. >> unless he gets hurt. >> hip goes out. >> which is a possibility. say then he's out 211 games, takes him -- actually if he waits out this season, that gets him deep halfway into the 2015 season. at which point he will be creeping up on 40 years old.
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it's over for him. >> it is over for him, willie. i think depending on what the arbitrator can pick any set of games. he can pick 50, 150, 211, which takes him to 2015. the commissioner i think took the wise course here in giving alex rodriguez the opportunity for due process. he does not turn him into a victim but doing this. a-rod is self-victimized. he did it himself. i think probably we're looking at the end of his career, no doubt about it. >> is that why people are so mad at him? there are other people -- >> even the players association, nicole, are down on alex rodriguez and the peds guys. they're cheaters. people are saying this is a bad day for baseball. i choose to think it's a strong day for baseball. >> great day for baseball. >> going after him hard and also, i wanted him suspended, i wanted him out, but baseball is so much smarter.
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the baseball -- let him go. stadium to stadium to stadium, getting booed. one after another. >> shocking. >> friday night, august 16th. >> i'm going to be there. >> the yankees visit fenway park. that is going to be hideous. >> i'm going to be there. >> i am too. participating. >> go -- >> in the hideousness. >> tell his story about what he did wrong. that would -- a little kid i was talking to last night shook his head and said he's wrong. he should go. >> he's a cheater. >> you've lost the kids. you've lost the children of america. >> especially -- >> what's the point. >> when they think or say do they all cheat? no, they don't all cheat. >> and they get to play still. that's what you're telling them. >> do they not all cheat? >> they do in the all cheat and you're seeing that now more and more as more players publicly state their feelings about what happened and about a-rod and the other guys, about nelson cruz and the other guys. they're cheaters, they don't want them in the game. >> hey, really quickly, i know we're going to show this lady
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flying through the air on a motor bike but the university of alabama fan -- i want to hear about johnny football. >> johnny manziel. >> what's happening with johnny football. sounds like the wheels are coming off? >> it's been a long offseason for the heisman trophy season. johnny manziel. >> he was a freshman. >> freshman sensation, first freshman ever to win the heisman. >> beat university of alabama. >> on the road. incredible season. >> don't appreciate it. >> espn is reporting, maybe you read about this, that he was paid pretty handsomely for a college kid to sign memorabilia. >> can't do that. >> started turning up on ebay and on-line and people were finding it, the ncaa got wind of this, reported by espn. espn is reporting a friend of manziel's, a buddy who serves as kind of his manager told an autograph broker manziel would no longer sign memorabilia for free, implying he wanted money. here's a photograph alleged to be of manziel inside this
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autograph broker's hotel room signing photographs for him. so if, in fact, manziel is found to have been selling his autograph, he would be in deep trouble with the ncaa, he would be suspended a couple games, perhaps, we don't know. these are allegations. >> wow. >> just terrible. >> getting paid five figure sums for doing this. he's just -- he's had a rough offseason. he went to manning's football camp, was supposed to be a mentor to the kids. instead he was -- >> didn't show up for the camp one morning. >> and just sort of slipped away. >> peyton manning gave him cover, said he overslept. peyton manning is a classy guy, but manziel has had a tough offseason in the spotlight. >> a terrific piece on this whole johnny mapzle stuff by wright thompson and espn magazine it's really a terrific piece on johnny manziel. >> manziel's family has said out loud and publicly why shouldn't he get a little money? all the money texas a&m has made off this kid.
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>> we agree. change the rules before you break them. >> all right. here's the lady we're going to show you. >> flying in the air. >> women's moto cross, the x games, she thinks she's about to win the race. >> that's great. look at this. >> that's -- oh, no. pumps her fist. she thought she was going to win it, opened the door and went down. going to take gold in los angeles over rutledge. >> she had a great run -- >> there's the celebration. >> she thinks she won. it's all over. i won this thing. >> hate to see that. >> that might have been -- >> you love to see a chick on a motorcross. that's cool. >> oh, yeah. >> she's sad. >> the agony of defeat at the x games. >> up next. >> how many times did i spike the ball on the 5 yard line. >> okay. >> only to find out later. only to find out later. >> that gentleman you're looking at, military veteran, business owner -- >> own. >> legislature, republican mike
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hill joins our conversation. >> made history. made history. alert.
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joining us now, state representative from florida mike hill. you know joe, you go way back. >> i do. >> my first question is tell me something we don't know about joe. >> oh, boy. >> joe has a kind heart. >> come on. this is not what you told me you were going to do. >> this is the truth. this was -- joe, if you remember this. >> yeah. >> i was coming out of albertson's a grocery store, no longer there. >> right. >> went out to my car, the battery was dead. oh, no. i get out and look, there's joe walking with your son, your son is about 3 or 4 years old at that time. >> right. >> i said joe, i need a jump. no problem. he jumped me. that's a kind heart. >> oh, that's -- that's just not what i -- >> usually when someone says joe jumped me in a parking lot -- >> those stories are usually i'm going after their beer or cigarettes -- but -- so mike and
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i have known each other a long time. mike made history, you're the first republican african-american man elected in the state legislature since the civil war. since -- >> i like to correct you on something there, though. >>. you called me an african-american. i'm not an african-american. i'm an american. this is my country. >> there you go. >> okay. >> this is where i was born and raised. where my parents were born and raised. this is where i said the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the united states of america. i think we need to get away from these hyphenated names. >> can't get it right. >> all it does is divide the country. we are one nation under god. >> you were before you ran, you were one of the leaders of the tea party movement in northwest florida, right? >> that's correct. northwest florida tea party i founded it and they asked me to be the president of it and i did. we held a number of rallies there in pensacola. usually had a decent crowd, about 3 to 400 people would show
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up. >> right. with signs of mika, get her -- >> where do you see the tea party going in the future? its past successes are obvious. the controversies well known. what's the future for the tea party. >> the future of the tea party will be determined whenever tyranny raises its head. that's what tea party is. simply a movement that's been with america since our founding. that whenever tyranny raises its head so does the spirit of the tea party that will come up and fight that tyranny. saw it with the revolutionary war, civil war, women's suffrage movement, we saw it with the civil rights movement, and now seeing it again because people are rising up against tyranny, tearing down the walls of our constitution. they want to be protected by the constitution. that's what tea party is. when that tyranny has been defeated it will melt back into the fabric of society until the next tyranny raises its head.
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>> which tyranny do you see from the government that concerns you the most? >> the disregard of our constitution. as on officer in the air force, i graduated from the air force academy, i said a pledge to protect and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies foreign and domestic and to see our constitution now being attacked is being ignored, the constitution was there to protect the people, protect the people from an intrusive government. >> who's doing the attacking of the constitution in your eyes? >> it has to be the government. i mean from both parties. when i say attacking the constitution, they're ignoring it. the boundaries that were there to prevent them from imposing upon the people of regulations, dictates, taxes, you name it, all that is being imposed by our government right now and the tea party is rising up saying enough is enough. >> so you -- when you ran, nobody expected you to win? >> nobody. >> for a thousand different reasons. in fact, kind of like -- i
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flan '94, the downtown crowd supported everybody else and then a runoff and they supported -- same thing happened to you. >> it did. the message i had of we need someone in office who's going to provide us with good, public policy, that was my message. good, public policy consists of is it constitutional, is it fiscally responsible, what problems will it fix, in the short term and long term and morally sound. northwest florida is a conservative part of the state so that message resonated well with both republicans and democrats and we surprised everyone by staying on that message and winning. >> you really did. mike, thank you so much for coming. good luck in tallahassee. stay strong. >> we are. governor rick scott is doing a great job and we're supporting him there. >> all right. thank you so much. >> we'll be right back. [ dad ] so i walked into that dealer's office
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. coming up next, tina brown and howard fineman join the table and "the washington post's" bob woodward. "morning joe" is back in a moment. ♪
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al qaeda appears to be planning something big although we don't know the exact target or method. >> we still don't know the time, date or target of any attack. >> what they don't know is the exact date, the exact location that that's going to occur or the nature of it. are they going to attack embassies, going to attack hotels? we don't know. >> thank you, nsa. now we know americans just need to avoid this area. that. just this. >> top of the hour jnlmen and ladies. back from washington, editor of the "washington post" bob
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woodward, a little going on in your world. here on the set, the editor and chief of "the daily beast" tina brown who really can like show her muster in 140 characters or less. >> oh, my goodness. >> hello. >> do not get in a twitter fight. >> i love her. >> that was -- that was quite a back and forth. >> you know what that was, howie kurtz and you. >> a little fun i was having. >> please, don't ever have fun at my expense. >> you're the greatest there was, editorial of the "the huffington post" and political analyst howard fineman. good to have you all at the table this morning. a lot of news to get to, the state department is urging americans living in yemen to leave immediately. and is evacuating nonessential staff. embassies across the muslim world and in africa are closed again this morning and now there is greater insight as to why. u.s. intelligence intercepted communications between al qaeda
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leader amman al zawahari in pakistan and the leader of the group's regional wing based in yemen. as al qaeda's central leadership weakens analysts say the organization is leaning on affiliate groups even more. we will continue to follow that. a lot of politics and media to cover this morning as well. down in the polls and zapped in momentum, anthony weiner is trying to stay on message in his bid to become new york's next mayor. >> how is that working for him. >> not well. >> really? >> that has been difficult with a press focused on scandal instead of issues. >> but the people are still with him. if i can talk issues. >> he goes to the people. >> what did the people say? >> he finds out they're not necessarily with him. take a look. >> [ bleep ] you. go back to your hampton house. >> you're very passionate. >> i'm passionate. more passionate than you on twitter. i'm a social media expert. okay. get someone to handle your [ bleep ]. you are disgusting. >> okay. >> disgusting.
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>> you've had your say. >> thank you all for quoting -- >> you have little kids here. >> little kids? you have no -- >> little kids. don't curse. >> you have no right to talk about little kids. >> okay. >> talking about little kids? social media. you want to see some twitter action. >> wow. >> oh, my gosh. >> carlos danger met his match. >> holy cow. willie geist, what do you do in a position like that. you are, of course, a campaign adviser to the president -- how do i respond if somebody comes up and yells -- >> you're a social media expert. >> handler of some sort to intervene. >> carlos danger out there. >> what would you do with that? >> he's freelancing. he handled it well. calm as long as he could be. >> the one bite -- >> and he actually was talking at the time that woman came up to a little girl -- >> oh, no. >> and her mother and someone came up throwing f bombs, f bombs.
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>> as a public service, a politician -- >> are you going to share -- >> i'm going to share what you do in a situation like that. >> tell us. >> when somebody is screaming and everybody is uncomfortable. >> and screaming "f" bombs at you. >> you stare and smile and then at the end you take off your glasses and you turn to somebody and you go, an old harry truman joke, we'll mark her down as undecided. everybody laughs and then you go and find the first baby to hug and move through the crowd. >> and hold the baby as a human shield. >> anthony weiner trying to debate this lady that's showering f bombs at her. >> i love the thing, you should have someone to handle your social media account. i thought that was sort of the final kind of, you know, ridiculousne ridiculousness. it's like old guy is not understanding you can't tweet out to a million people -- >> it's unbelievable. >> lot to get to. programming decisions by nbc and cnn are creating a controversy with republicans and could impact the 2016 election. rnc chairman reince priebus is
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calling on both networks to reconsider their decisions to shoot and air programs about hillary clinton. if they proceed with their productions, preab pre bus says he will not partner with the networks for debates during the next presidential election cycle. >> is this about a time that our party stands up and protects the party and our candidates from networks that are not in the business of promoting our party, they're not in the business of promoting our candidates, they're not in the business of doing anything but promoting the democratic party. and i'm not going to sit around and watch this happen anymore. >> wow. nbc news released a statement in response to him saying they are completely independent of nbc entaintment and has no involvement in this prompt. >> you agree with the rnc chairman, don't you? >> i do. i think when you're a news organization you have to find some way to balance this out. i think nbc entertainment can do whatever movie they think will
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sell. it's different. >> howard, do you agree? >> let's see. i work for nbc news. >> right. >> i work for "the huffington post." >> right. >> let's put both of that on the table. >> perfect, actually. >> i agree with nbc news, not surprisingly. it's a separate deal. and hillary clinton is a fascinating personal story. >> a drama. >> a drama. whether she runs for president or not. i disagree. i respectfully disagree. >> tina, in 1983 -- >> i'm sorry, joe. >> show you "newsweek" cover, 1983 "the right stuff" came out, greatest movie of all time, and everybody thought that was going to help propel john glenn to the democratic nomination. it ended up doing absolutely nothing for him, even though glenn was one of the stars in the heros of that movie. i suspect at the end this probably won't have a political impact but republicans -- >> i think that's right. frankly i think it behooves
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republicans to come up with a few team to write mini series about. let's hire david chase to do, you know, to work on a christie story, get vince gilligan to do rand paul. at the end of the day they can't help the fact that hillary clinton is a fascinating person. >> and a woman. >> and her husband. >> it's a different situation. actually that was my first "newsweek" political story that i was involved was that john glenn story. >> yeah. >> what was interesting was that we didn't put john glenn on the cover, we put the actor. >> ed harris. >> harris on the cover. so that's one difference. the other difference is, "newsweek" was a whole, one entity and what's on the cover speaks for the whole magazine. television is different. s theres's entertainment, obvious entertainment shows on televisions and news shows on television and they're not the same thing. i would say if this is what the chairman of the rnc is really upset about and agitating about right now given what's going on with the republican party, i would say they've got deeper
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problems than that they need to address. >> shows the fear that hillary is already spreading in the republican party they're mad about such a thing. >> it is. we were talking about the lady going to be the presumptive nomination for the democratic party and are they going to give her basically a glossy, you know, biopic will cause problems for nbc news even though it's not connected or cnn if they are trying to curry favor with hillary, which a lot of news organizations are going to be doing now. >> we can make the distinction between nbc news and entertainment but i don't think a lot of republicans and conservatives or some moderates make that disit tinkion. they think nbc is nbc. they will be lummedped together a lot of quarters. this isn't great for hillary clinton either. she has no control over what this film says. any telling of her life story will include monica lewinsky and other things she would not like rehashed and put out in the
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public again. there are two sides to this. >> who says how she will be portrayed. she doesn't control it. >> we have to get bob woodward in here and this would be the perfect segway to do so. from "newsweek" to the globe to "the washington post" one of the most iconic publications in the history of journalism, "the washington post" will have a new owner. jeff bezos the man who founded amazon.com paid out $250 million for the paper. that is less than 1% of his estimated $28 billion fortune. the post has faced the same head winds as other papers, posting a $49 million loss in the first half of this year alone. and its circulation has withered by nearly half from its peak in 1993. it is the latest in a string of big media deals where the value of internet and tv companies far outpaced newspapers. facebook bought instagram with its dozen employees for $1 billion. al jazeera paid nearly $500 million for current tv. while "the boston globe" sold
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days ago to red sox owner john henry for $70 million. a fraction of the $1.1 billion "the new york times" paid for it 20 years ago. >> bob woodward, like to talk about larger media trends but this "washington post" story personal for you, talk about yesterday your feelings, talk about the future of the post. >> it's sad, but we're in this survival game and i think when you look at this, the bottom line in really everything surrounding it, is good news. jeff bezos is one of the real innovators. he understands things in ways that other people don't. he's willing to put a lot of his own money on the line here. he has deep pockets. we've discussed about, you know, what's the status of journalism reporting. do we really know what goes on? i think anyone will tell you in the news business, we don't dig
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deep enough. i think this is somebody who's -- who digs deep. he -- he gave a very interesting speech nine years ago in which he said, whenever there is something that is big that's done inefficiently, it's an opportunity. and if there's anything done inefficiently it's the news business and so we need to be shaken up. i think he will do that. i know him a little bit. he's just an original and so this isn't rupert murdoch buying "the wall street journal". this is somebody who believes in the values that the post has been prominent in practicing and so i don't see any downside. >> tina. >> tina brown, do you have a question? >> well, did -- do you think -- have you thought about how this will fit into bezo's overall
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company in terms of it's not part of amazon, but his overall vision? has he given any sense, do you think, of what he will do to make this great innovation, that every newspaper, every print organization, every legacy media company has been questing for, sort of fruitlessly really for the last it ten years? >> well, i think it's going to work, quite frankly. we need a rennas sans in reporting. "the washington post" i think spends about $100 million on its news collecting operation. suppose somebody is now coming in and saying, let's double, let's triple, let's hyper invest which, of course, is the jeff bezos trademark at amazon and make it better and so, you know, i vice president talked to him about -- i haven't talked to him about it but i think he has a idea or will develop an idea here. you know, i don't see the downside. don graham, the ceo, said
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yesterday, quite rightly, seven years of declining revenue, you have to do something. you know, tina, so well, "newsweek" was sold for a dollar. >> yes. >> and, you know, the dwindling value of these media products is a reality and to have somebody come in with his experience, kind of innovative mindset, good thing. i don't see bad in this. >> okay. >> last year by the way, jeff bezos told a german newspaper, part of what he said, there is one thing i'm certain about, there won't be printed newspapers in 20 years. maybe as luxury items in some hotels that want to offer them as an extravagant service. printed papers won't be normal in 20 years. he added, on the web, people don't pay for news and it's too late for that to change. >> okay. >> do you agree with that? >> i do. i think 20 years is costing a lot.
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i don't think there's going to be print news papers in five years. >> really? >> well, "the huffington post" is as they like to say, web native. we didn't ever exist in print. we didn't exist eight years ago. right now we have 75 million readers a month. >> which makes sense but there's a task of trying to transition from paper to on-line which is much more difficult. >> when we started. when we started. when arianna huffington started it. we don't have all the legacy or logistical costs. the trucks, the gasoline, the news print, the printing -- >> that's the point. >> all that stuff. but we also had a different concept which is i think something jeff bezos will focus on. not just logistics and not just the naked economics. it's a different concept because news is not a one-way thing anymore. it's a communal thing. a person i know said that the way "the new york times" and probably "the washington post"
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would say when they printed a story that was the end of the conversation. when we print a story at "the huffington post," it's the beginning of the conversation and that's where bezos, who's service oriented and knows how to reach out to people as customers, is going to take "the washington post." >> tina? >> i think you're right, obviously, about that howard. of course "the huffington post" was built on free content by journalists who weren't being paid which, of course, is one of the issue -- >> now they are. >> but they weren't for the first few years. one of the issues that everybody always deals with when owning content like this is that journalism is expensive. and there is waste in journalism inevitably. you never know where the news is going to take you. if a war blows up and you have to send people to cover it it's not necessarily something you budgeted for that year. >> tina -- >> that's why news is always been expensive, be it broadcast or print. >> we're going through a transition. "the huffington post" in washington we have one of the biggest bur ross in washington now. we have a reporter full-time on the labor beat and another one on the labor beat.
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almost nobody else in town has a labor reporter. we at "the huffington post" do. it's a transition we're going through. >> question just to put the "the huffington post" aside for a second, what do you think the biggest challenge is going to be for "the washington post" as it makes a transition into the future with new ownership? >> i think it's fantastic jeff bezos has bought it. it's the graham family's final act of commitment po the paper to put the shareholders and public ahead of their own personal feeling for the paper to say we're going to give it to a safer home than we can be. we've run out of ideas. i thought was the most humble thing he did. i love what he said. >> bring in bob woodward here. bob. >> yes, sir. >> here's my concern. i understand -- love arianna, love "the huffington post," love tina, love "the daily beast." here's my concern, as we move from print with the big trucks dropping the big piles of papers out and all the big car companies paying big money to
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get their ads in the big fat newspapers, when that starts going away, investigative reporting, the likes of which you've done, goes away. you got "the new york times," we've got "the washington post." arianna is trying to do it i know and tina is as well, but you go state by state by state, i just had a florida state rep here, it used to be, if that guy does anything wrong in tallahassee, it used to be there were six newspapers in tallahassee looking at the governor, looking at the state legislature, looking at the lobbyists, there's one now. and that's in a huge state. there's one bureau. you go state by state by state by state, what happened yesterday, yeah, we're in transition, let's celebrate that transition. government is going to become more corrupt if these changes continue and newspapers printed newspapers wither on the vine. will it not cause a real problem
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for this country? >> yeah. but here's -- it's not an issue of whether it's delivered in news print or on the internet. the question is, the quality of the information and tina's right, it's expansive. are you willing to spend the money? and jeff bezos has demonstrated that throughout his career in the creation of amazon, something that didn't exist decades ago. >> bob, let me challenge you here, though. bezos himself said people aren't going to pay for internet and they've been -- it's too late for that. and he said, newspapers are going to be gone in ten, 20 years. the question is, how do you pay for the investigative reporters? how do you pay for the foreign correspondents some. >> but he did say that, but there's another quote where he said no, it looks like people are willing to pay for this on the internet now. now let's high thoth size. suppose you have a news organization that can tell you
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what really is going on with the nsa, national security agency, what that's really about. if you look at the news coverage of that which i think has been very, very good, there's still more questions and mysteries. what really goes on in the white house. joe, do you know, do you think we have any idea what goes on in these hedge funds or these big banks in america. we do not. if somebody's willing to come in and it's a matter of money and invest and tell us what's really going on, that is a product that people will pay for and as jeff bezos has said, it is a product that we need, it is in the tradition of the graham ownership of "the washington post." i think it does get down to money. and here is the guy whose demonstrated he's willing not
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only to spend hundreds of millions of dollars but billions to put himself in a position where he can beat the competition. we talk in the news business all the time about competition and it's there. this is a guy who's not afraid of it and he's run over the competition time and time again. >> all right. >> tina, then howard. >> tina, the best thing about jeff bezos he invested in a 10,000 year clock because actually, he does have the kind of long-term vision which has bedevilled so many, you know, media companies. and also almost the best thing is, it's a personal buy. it's actually not going to be a public company anymore. it's arguable public companies really can invest in news businesses because they are so kind of inefficient and unstable and all the things that really you need to be if you're going to be an investigative journalist outfit where you can take the decisions you want to take without being fearful your advertisers and of your -- >> tina is right. it's a personal commitment.
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i've been lucky in my career to work for the binghams in louisville where it was a great paper providing the coverage you're talking about in frank further and then the grahams at "newsweek." i worked at "newsweek" for three decades and i was honored to work for both families and in both cases it was their personal commitment and willingness to make money elsewhere around the periphery it to support the journalism. over the elevator at the courier journal every day a quote from robert bingham saying, i view these newspapers as a public trust. that was inspiring to us and the grahams were the same way. let's hope that jeff bezos is the same way too. it seems to me he probably is if he's willing to spend $250 million of his own money. >> i'm being corrected on twitter. 87 newspapers in florida with the reporters in tallahassee, not one. actually, i will get the exact number of capital bureaus. i knew a lot of bureaus were being shut down a couple years
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ago. >> tallahassee is ferocious. another guy says this time joe, nbc, this is peter, joe misses the point. now there are hundreds of citizens doing the same thing on a scale that's not as easily influenced which, obviously, you do have a lot of people, you know -- >> they don't have the clout that the old statewide newspapers had. >> i've got here a couple of corrections in the newspaper and i need to work on my poker face when conservatives are on the set. >> all right. >> bob woodward, thank you. >> thank you, bob. >> howard fineman. >> listen, by the way, i even buy my shoes on amazon. >> don't talk them off. please. if you can find a deal for me. >> okay. >> then if i can say this, remember what bezos said about books. he said when they created the kindle he said we're not imitating books, we're making books better. lots of people believed that.
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so maybe not only will he make news better, maybe he'll make shoes better. >> there you go. >> willie how to make a better bob woodward also. >> can't do that. >> i don't think that's possible. >> howard, thank you so much. tina, stay with us. still ahead from the homeland security committee peter king joins us. he said the stuff he's seen over the past couple weeks is frightping as anything he's seen in a while. >> all right. brian chess ki is coming up. also coming up collision 2012. chief correspondent dan balz here with his new book. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. >> it's "washington post" day. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server.
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president obama is headed to phoenix today to lay out his plan to overhaul the u.s. mortgage finance system. his plan is going to reportedly
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replace fannie mae and freddie mac with a system relying on the private sector to buy mortgages from lenders. with us now from the white house, the secretary for housing and urban development secretary shuan donovan. great to you here. >> great to be back with you. >> does this mean we taxpayers are going to have to stop bailing out fannie and freddie and paying for the distortions and the markets that these two entities have caused? >> not only that, what the president is saying today is we got to build a system overall that makes sure we never have a crisis like we had again. i mean just think about the impact of trillions of dollars of savings lost that has gone in the past to help send kids to college, build small businesses, save for retirement. we have to build a safer system and the president is encouraged there's bipartisan progress on the hill on this and he wants to work with members to get this done as quickly as possible.
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>> give us more details about what the president is going to be saying here about the kinds of reforms we're going to be looking at, because it certainly has taken a long time to work with these banks and to create a situation where you don't have too big to fail and other problems and, in fact, quite frankly, it hasn't worked on some levels. >> well, first of all, let's recognize we've made real progress on housing. phoenix is a place he went to four years ago to lay out his plan and we're seeing a strong recovery. but he's going to talk about five specific things we can do today to accelerate the housing recovery, create more jobs, but he's going to lay out a set of four principles for what housing finance reform has to look like. private capital has to be first. we have to end this model of fannie and freddie which was basically heads they win, tales, taxpayers lose, but we also need to make sure we have a system that provides access. it's been one of the hallmarks of our housing system when we
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had a sane housing system that really made sure that a broad range of families could access to a 30-year mortgage which protected them for the long term. that means a three-page form that people can actually read on what they're getting in a mortgage. and it means a range of other things that simplify the process and make it safe for consumers that go beyond just fannie and freddie. >> mr. secretary, going back to the cost of fannie and freddie, the bailout according to the cbo is $317 billion. i think fannie paid back about $60 billion. a quarter or two ago because they had record profits. can we expect repayment of this $300 billion debt moving forward? >> what i can tell you is the president is going to make sure, one, that our housing market keeps recovering so that we do see money coming back to the taxpayers. it's over $100 billion in total already that's come back through fannie and freddie. but again, that's not enough. we have to make sure we build a
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system for the future that's permanently fixed. it isn't just about fannie and freddie. it's about making sure we have a broader system that helps homeowners in the future and builds a middle class. part of that honestly is immigration reform. 40% of immigrants become homeowners in short order in coming to this country. he's also going to focus on immigration reform as an important piece of building a housing system for the future. >> yeah. all right. >> secretary shaun donovan, thank you very much. good luck. >> thanks a lot. >> thank you. >> up next "the washington post's" dan balz on the future of elections in america. keep it right here on "morning joe." [ engine revving ]
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this is an election with one voter, mitt romney. and he gets to decide who he thinks will be the best vice president of the united states, the person best prepared to serve with him to turn our country around. i love being governor but the fact is if governor romney picks up the phone and calls then you have to answer the call and listen at least. >> that was interesting, governor chris christie whether he would consider running with mitt romney for the gop ticket. we got chief correspondent for
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"the washington post," this is "washington post" day. >> it really is. >> for deep discounts on our next amazon.com -- dan balz, how republican put the full-court press on chris christie, collision 2012, obama versus romney, the future of elections in america and my goodness, chris christie is at least the best supporting actor in this book. i mean republicans were after him like crazy to get into this race, right? >> they were. the interesting thing is that they were after him at a point when mitt romney was in the race, the field was pretty much fully formed, and yet there was a part of the party that was always uneasy about governor romney. >> and roger rails called him up to his house, tried to beg him too to get into the race. roger aels. >> for a long time he put it at bay but there was a breakfast here in new york in the middle of last summer that he went to. he thought it was going to be a relatively small gathering as he
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had been led to believe. he got to the room and there were 60 people there. speaker phone, people calling in to urge him to run and the last person to speak was henry kissinger said being president is about having courage and character and you have both and your country needs you and he said at that point he was as speechless as chris christie ever is but said i will consider it and take seriously what you are saying and thinking about it. >> george w. bush called him. >> barbara bush called his wife to say if you're worried about your children being in the white house, i can see from my granddaughters that, you know, you don't have to worry about that. they'll be fine. i mean it was an amazing -- >> it was like an intervention. whatever the equivalent, the billionaires intervention, the wall street guys loved him. >> courting him. >> at the end, he never got any further than he had been at the beginning, too early for him to do it, not ready to be a candidate, and as his father said to him, he called his father at one point after he had spokep at the reagan library and
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his father said how old are you? i'm 48. do you love your job? i love my job. >> why do you want to leave your job to run for president? >> your reporting is magnificent on christie but the most important thing you do here that i haven't seen anywhere else, you capture the two sides of him. he is at the same time supremely confident but also, you capture his wonder and how -- can you talk about that? i don't think we pay enough attention. his own wonder at how much people want him in our national araen na, to me is the most charming thing about it. >> one aspect you see from time to time, he is a jersey kid and a little bit starstruck about that and so when people come to him and when he describes it, i mean he described it with such kind of relish and awe even well after the fact, a little bit like a little kid, and i went up to see him in trenton and interviewed him in the governor's office last september and just said, walk me through
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what this was like start to finish as people tried to get you to run for president and he's a great storyteller and he has a great memory about things that happened and what people were saying at the time and he went through it. but you're absolutely right. he's got this kind of wide-eyed view of it all as he talks about it. >> that is, mika, isn't that one of the things we found early on, good friends with chris, talked with him a good bit about this, and there was just this contrast between chris christie, tough guy, and chris christie little kid going -- >> who me? >> somebody called me and asked me to run? >> i got to meet bruce springsteen. >> yeah. >> and he hugged me. he hugged me. >> i called him and i said you're going to have to -- >> mika would say tone it down a little bit. its is endearing he's not cynical, he hasn't been around this game for 30 years. he was a prosecutor in 2008. not so long ago. >> i think the process was
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probably really, really helpful to him down the road because you learn a lot without having to actually jump in and i think he's kind of self-aware and that's why -- >> knew it wasn't his time. >> the thing is, that joy, wonder and pressure, can turn on a dime. >> oh, my lord. >> and all of a sudden you are toast. people can turn on you with such viciousness that, you know, you got to be ready for that too. >> yes, they can. >> really, tina? >> i don't know. >> some write articles just to take people down. >> that never happens. >> so dan, let's talk about mitt romney. you're talking about how mitt romney didn't trust outside polls. we had stories of the romneys being so insulated that even on election night ann romney was sure what she was seeing on the news was wrong. they believed they were going to win up until the end. on the other side, talk to david axelrod for three months, david is going, we're going to win by four points. after the first debate we're
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going to win by four points. they were so cold heartedly calculated on the obama side, i say that in a positive way, whereas the the romneys were still believing what they were hearing inside the bubble, that's after the race was over. >> david plouffe told me eight or nine months before the election, he said, we'll win more than 300 electoral votes at a time when people thought it was going to be a much closer race. here's what happened. the romney team was very confident at the end. when i talked to governor romney last january for the book he said i was quite confident on election day, not 90% confident but they thought they were going to win. on the very day of the election, hours before the polls closed, paul ryan was talking to people about immediately resigning as chair of the budget committee to devote himself full time to getting ready to be vice president. two things were wrong. one is, they misjudged what the electorate was going to be. you know, i called this book
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"collision 2012" in part because it was a collision between the america that elected barack obama in 2008 and the america that swept republicans into the house in 2010. and this was the clash. and the romney team thought that the electorate in 2012 was going to be more like that of 2010. hire number of whites than turned out, lower number of minorities, more republicans, fewer democrats than it happened. so their polling was always off and as you say, the obama team was always confident. >> nicole, i know that you got these calls the final weekend. i got them the final weekend. from republicans who had been telling me for years, every four years, right, they've been right, we're going to win today. it's looking good. we're going to lose next week. on saturday the calls were all gleeful out of pennsylvania. 30,000. i'm telling you, we feel it. we're going to win this thing. they didn't -- didn't you get all those calls. >> florida -- >> people trusted.
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>> and florida was the one, though, where i think on election day, a lot of folks that i worked with, jeb bush's office, early in the day said, it isn't going to happen here. obviously romney's magic math that they believed had him sweeping some of those big states that mccape had lost. so -- mccain had lost. i was impressed, romney didn't lay any blame at anyone's feet in the interviews with you. he's still a very impressive human being. can you talk about romney's humanity and dignity. >> you're absolutely right. when i went to see him, i went to see him at their home outside of boston and just the two of us, no aides there. we spent an hour and a half talking about it. he was not defensively. he was friendly. i asked him everything i could in 90 minutes. he took every question. he's a very decent man and has a lot of attributes some of which he wasn't able to jekproject as candidate and you can blame his campaign or question how they
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did it. there were a couple elements about the campaign that i think he was still processing. one was the 47% comment which as we know was terribly damaging. >> devastating. >> and he knows was terribly damaging but had he still was trying to figure that out. the other interesting part of that interview among others was the self-deportation line that he had uttered in one of the debates which he thought was a much more benign phrase than the rest of the world took it. >> isn't that being tone deaf and living inside this bubble where you only read and see what is reinforcing to yourself? >> to some extent. if you are a candidate you're in a bubble. that's the reality. and, you know, as you all say, toward the end -- >> who's cleaning out the refrigerator on election day? >> mitt romney is. i would be doing something different. the book is "collision 2012" obama versus romney. you can read an excerpt on our site mojo.msnbc.com.
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that's a viral video paying homage to the band mumford and sons. you'll recognize ed helms, jason bateman, jason sudeikis and will for te. wow. that was not pretty. >> that was wild. >> it was awful actually. >> up next he costars opposite harrison ford, the new thriller "paranoia" liam hemsworth is here with author joseph findser whose book inspired the movie. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ school bell rings ] ♪ school's out for summer ♪ [ male announcer ] from the last day of school, back to the first. they're gonna need a lot of stuff. for everything kids need to everything they want in styles and colors as unique as they are. staples has it. stock up for the year now
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>> let me skplap explain how how this is going to work. we hit one of your friends first, maybe the girl. >> if you even touch her -- >> them get us what we need.
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>> that was a scene from the upcoming thriller, "paranoia. it's based on the "new york times" best selling book by author joseph fender who joins us with the film's co-star liam hemsworth. great to have you both. joseph, what incredible timing, this movie. the book came out you said in 2004. >> 2004. >> did he envision a movie? >> yeah, in my head. when i wrote it, it was a movie in my head. it was a different movie but it was my movie. i always thought it could be, the question was who would be the right adam, the central character. >> there he is. >> liam is great. >> so liam, i get paranoid just looking at that scene actually. what was it like getting into this character?
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where did it take you? >> it was exciting. when i read the script, i became really fascinated with the whole world of corporate espionage. just reading up and learning about different cases in the past and finding out it's real and it's actually a serious issue. >> joseph, give us a sense of the plot here, not telling people everything but a sense of what happens to this young man and the position he's put in. >> he's a guy who works for a high-tech company. he kind of does something to help his friends and gets in trouble. then the ceo of the company brings him in and says you're going to prison or you're going to work for me as a spy. he has no choice. so adam goes to work for this other company working for harrison ford, who is this great, upstanding person. he begins to feel really guilty about it. then when he wants to back out of it, bad things happen. >> mike barnicle.
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>> i ask today's dumb question. >> you do? >> it's wonderful. it's about the range of your ability. specifically i've always been interested in how so many people from you, from australia, great britain, gary oldman, you can do the accent, american accent, instantly. >> it does take time. if i was just to try and talk in an american accident right now, it would be hard and probably slip. when you learn your lines, i do it a million times and work with accent coaches all the time. i've been doing it for five or six years. >> this guy here, you grew up in afghanistan practically. >> lived there early on. >> amazing. >> english is my second language. >> you get some good material growing up with a diverse background like that. do moviegoers leave the theater paranoid? >> i think so. it's an incredible thrill ride. they took my book and turned it
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up to 11. >> you can catch "paranoia in theaters august 16th. liam hemsworth and joseph fender. rnc threatens to pull out of the debates on cnn and nbc while he's playing tough with the networks when "morning joe" comes back. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together.
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reince ribs. it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. take another drink and roll over in bed. malibu will wait, my friend. back east we take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, california's own nicolle wallace. mike barnicle and in washington, d.c., gene robinson. this is huge. as willy was saying last night at the holiday inn, the plates are shifting under the media world. then we had a couple of smokes and watched reruns of -- >> ran out of cigarettes. >> gone through one pack talking about globe, another pack -- all this stuff going on. >> the sale of the post, i'm sure gene will have more to say
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about this, it was stunning. >> earthquake. >> few families who have owned newspapers have been better at it and more honorable at it than the graham family. i choose to think donny graham and that aspect of the clan chose to sell the paper to safe the paper. >> absolutely. it's obviously one of the most iconic publications in the history of journalism. now "the washington post" has a new owner. the man who founded amazon.com guiding it from a startup to internet giant will take the reines. he paid $250 million to the "washington post" to do so. that's less than 1% of his $28 billion fortune. >> he's good. >> he's okay. a couple of other entities coming wit. the paper which helped topple president nixon with its reporting had been in the graham family for generations. some long time employees openly
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wept at the surprise announcement. but chairman don graham said no one should be sad except for him. >> we knew we could keep the post alive. we knew it could survive, but our aspirations for the "post" have been hired by that. we went to see if we could find a buyer who would do a fair deal for "the washington post" and our shareholders but also open a better possibility for the future of the post. >> the post has faced the same headwind as other papers, posting a $49 million loss in the first half of this year alone. its circulation has withered from half of its peak in 1993. it is the latest in the string of big media deals where the value of internet and tv companies far outpace newspapers. facebook bought instagram with its dozen employees for a
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million. al jazeera for current tv. boston globe sold to red sox owner john henry for just $70 million, a fraction of the $1.1 billion "the new york times" paid for it just 20 years ago. >> unbelievable. we just saw a story in the paper yesterday talking about barry diller investing in "newsweek." they walk away from it feeling like they made a bad mistake. john henry jumped in fire sale at the "boston globe." now "the washington post," mike barnicle. you've been in the news business most of your life. is this the end. >> new beginning. >> or somebody who can do what barry couldn't. >> i think there are a couple of aspects to it. i think clearly print is an endangered species. the idea of the newspaper at the end of the driveway. that's an endangered species to some extent of the hopeful aspect of this, both of these
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purchases, jeff and john henry both bring something to the newspaper that's not there right n now. that's another view of where to take things in the future on the web with video streaming components to print. it could be what their view is could save and enrich the existing product. >> gene, this has happened before. this has been happening for couple of years. rich guys with a bunch of money -- he bought the tribune. it's a disaster, a disaster for him, disaster for the company. again, we can it talk about barry deller who knew quickly weekly magazines would be an extraordinary challenge. i just wonder what's going to be different here, other than the fact you write a column at the "washington post" which gives us
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all hope for journalism. >> thanks, joe. i hope that does play my own small part in this. there are rich guys and there are rich guys. jeff bezos, i understand is a prince among men. that's what i hear from the press as you well know. he's a great disrupter. he reinvented publishing. he reinvented retailing. so i think he's -- >> tell us something great about your boss. he's good looking, great disrupter. >> i don't know our new boss, but i do know that what mike said is right, that the graham family knew it could keep the post going, knew that we could
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survive indefinitely, but didn't know how to make us grow, didn't know what the next newspaper model was. one thing you have to be encouraged about, you know, the lion's share of the post's revenue still comes from the print edition. it's like 70, used to be 80%. jeff bezos is a guy who actually physically delivers stuff. he understands that part of it as well as the internet part. so you know, you have to be optimistic. yesterday people were literally stunned at the staff meeting. you could have heard a pin drop. it was amazing. >> a lot of weeping going on? >> were people crying? >> some weeping. a lot of nostalgia, a lot of hugs, but mostly stunned surprise. it's a day none of us thought would ever come, yet here we are. "washington post" not owned by
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the graham family. >> mike and willy, odd time not related to any announcements whatsoever. >> quick, what's the ratio inside that newsroom of disappointment to excitement about what jeff bezos might bring. you knew the model "the washington post" currently has is unsustainable as other newspapers have shown. what would you say talking to your friends at the post is the general feeling? >> well, the general feeling is still shock. since we're newspaper people, we will eventually get to the grousing part of it. >> eventually? you guys are grousing right now, you just won't say it. come on. >> well, we're not even capable of grousing at this point. look, if you work in the newspaper business right now. >> let me help you with grousing
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real quickly. rupert murdoch, certainly everybody in town believes he owns the "new york post," which he loses 40, $50 million a year because it's a hammer over people in new york city. all you have to do is going to a dinner party in new york city and hear people fretting and being worried about what the "new york post" said. sit back and go, that rupert murdoch, he's a smart guy. everybody says the $50, $60 million he invests and loses is worth it. so you've got this guy, one of the most powerful, modern day industrialists in america, he buys the newspaper in the company town that determines how his business is regulated, how it's taxed, how his sector -- if you have so much money to burn, and you said just a few years ago that print is dead in 20 years in an interview, why not go ahead and throw some money
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out there and control the newspaper that is a newspaper in a company town that is all about regulating his business interests. >> that's true, joe. it's also true that the "washington post" is an iconic worldwide brand. >> he will not grouse on tv. >> he can't grouse. it's too soon. is it too soon yet? >> can i just say one word, though, about don graham. don, i think, has never gotten the credit he is due as a publisher and a person. he has been a wonderful -- it's been a wonderful experience working for him. i think those of us who will be shifting over with the new company will always consider him a friend and someone who really has a tremendous impact in this
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community, in journalism, the highest standards, a man of true honor and just a great guy. >> we're showing the front page as you say that. we have another story that's very interesting in terms of tv news and entertainment programming. decisions by nbc and cnn are creating a controversy within republican party with republicans and could impact the 2016 election. rnc chairman reince priebus. >> i like him by the way. >> caused both networks to reconsider their decisions to air programs. >> i'm sorry, go ahead. just gotten off the flight from africa. i think he was tired. >> very. what reince is doing is trying to get cnn and nbc to reconsider programs they are doing about hillary clinton. if they proceed with their productions, priebus says, he will not partner with the networks for debates during the
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next presidential election cycle. >> it's about a time that our party stands up and protects the party and our candidates from networks that are not in the business of promoting our party, they are not in the business of promoting our candidates, they are not in the business of doing anything but promoting the democratic party. i'm not going to sit around and watch this happen anymore. >> i don't disagree with him kneesly. nbc news has released a statement in response to priebus saying, quote, nbc news is completely independent of nbc entertainment and has no involvement in this project. i think at least if there's an entertainment division, doesn't bother me so much but if you're a news organization, it's kind of a conflict. >> you said off the air, mika, it was as if they were trying to climb up something, the entire clinton organization. >> did i say that? >> you may have said that off the air. >> i don't remember anything. >> we republicans -- democrats never have to worry about this.
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even after he's dead if you do a story about ronald reagan, you have him doddering going, is this the nuclear button? nancy? nancy? what's my name? then nancy comes in with a knife -- >> i actually have to say i saw the butler last night and he's treated well. the rnc makes a good point but asking for the wrong thing. i think we should ask for a seven-part miniseries about chris christie. the problem isn't media is interested in politics. that's good. i write novels about the white house. i cheer when politics becomes fodder for entertainment. the problem is, it is always -- >> it is always democrats that are always horrified. >> it solidifies our paranoia
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they sit around at a cocktail party -- >> we've lived in this community now. these people are our friends. it's not paranoia. they adore and worship progressives and they look at conservatives like us -- they like me and they like you, but it's a curiosity. they would never go, lets do a miniseries on scott walker or chris christie. >> or marco. >> let me ask a question, joe. you're the head of nbc entertainment. >> that's different. >> i come to you as a potential producer with two projects, i'm looking for a green light on one or the other. i have one project, sort of the life and times of hillary clinton, kind of an interesting character. the other project is the one i really like, the life and times of mitt romney. which one are you going to green light? >> that's fine. i probably won't green light either of them.
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seriously, mika and i have been in a lot of these pitch meetings. if somebody pitched me the the story of hillary clinton, i'd say, let me ask you, this is it going to be bright and shiny? are you going to talk about bill clinton's infidelities? are you going to talk about the choices she had to make. are you going to have the viewer asking did she really stay with him because she loved him or wanted to be senator and president of the states. what about benghazi, the pretty parts? if you're going to do a glorify indication of hillary clinton -- i would say this. if at the end of this movie, you've got viewers going, i wonder if this was a good movie for hillary clinton or a bad movie for hillary clinton, then at that point i would say, okay, you know what, lets develop the script and see what happens. i think we republicans, nicole, know how this ends, it's always
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a glorify indication. by the way, i'm speaking as someone that loves and respects hillary clinton. and i do. >> i'm sure hillary clinton doesn't want these movies made. what do you want as a politician? you want control. she has no control over how she's depicted. this cements in the minds of republicans -- this is the only card he has. all he's going to do is say these two outlets won't participate in republican primary debates and he's wise to do that. >> very. >> these things happens all the time. it cements in the minds of half the country doesn't vote or embrace liberal media, cements the idea it's a grand conspiracy. >> a billion dollars business. how brian went from out of work to the cover of "forbes" magazine. up next congressman peter king back from a quick trip to
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new hampshire. >> what's he doing up there? >> i don't think. >> i thought that was only in argentina. you can ski in august? >> maybe south carolina. >> ski in argentina. >> i would think bill karins with a check of the forecast. bill. >> good morning, everyone. unfortunately some serious stuff going on in missouri with the weather overnight. some water rescues taking place. firemen that go on rescue boats and get people out of houses, in one town the fire boat capsized and had to rescue the firemen in the water. sounds like everyone is okay thankfully. here is the area of thunderstorms and heavy rain that drenched southern missouri. it was in the ozarks. the incident i'm talking about took place in waynesville. looks like light rain is finally coming to an end there. it was just a nightmare scene there overnight. as far as the east goes, showers and storms through virginia and maryland. a little there, areas of
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baltimore. as we go throughout the afternoon from philly southward, hit and miss showers and storms. still nice, still dry from new york city to new england. talk about heat, one of the hottest days of the summer, from dallas to oklahoma. 103 today. looks like it's going to be 100 all week long in the big d. try to stay in the shade, jump in the pool if you can if it's not too warm. heard some reports the water is 90 degrees if you jump in the backyard. mention some showers, reagan national a few drops on the lens. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. sfx: oil gushing out of pipe. sfx: birds chirping.
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>> there's no question over the past several years al qaeda core has been greatly diminished, not least because of the elimination of osama bin laden. what is also true is that al qaeda and affiliated organizations represent a continued threat to the united states. >> welcome back to "morning joe." it is 22 past the hour. >> 8:22 a.m. eastern time. >> that's when you're at your best, 8:22. that's where you peak. so nicole, it's so fascinating listening to the obama administration talking about the threat from al qaeda. they are balancing so many of the same things that the bush administration balanced. what's interesting is when they put america on high alert, you
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don't have everybody in the press going, are they doing this for political reasons. aren't you waiting for the first major newspaper to make that suggestion? i haven't heard it yet. >> it is interesting. i think this is a place where where else do we have representative king and jay carney saying exactly the same thing, singing from exactly the same song sheet. it gives us reinsurance about the truth of something incredibly dire and depressing, the threat of terrorism is as grave now as it was in 2001. >> skeptics would say and certainly glen greenwald has said this they are trotting now out because of the nsa program. >> al qaeda is now a franchise operation in several different areas of the globe, which poses enormous obstacles in terms of intelligence gathering for us
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and other of our allies around the world. it's very difficult to pinpoint intelligence on the ground in yemen, afghanistan, central africa. it's a daily and constant struggle. >> it is a big move to close down up to 22 embassies at once. it makes our job around the world even harder. i was talking to mark last night. it's like how do you do outreach from an embassy when you're living -- >> is he shut down? >> not yet. security is unbelievable. >> came on the show and said americans in these countries, they rely on the u.s. embassy to be open. he thinks it makes us look weak across the world. this has got to be post benghazi where they don't want another benghazi to happen. >> it's funny. the consciousness of people how they react. there's caution and pull back and do something like this and nothing bad happens. no different than marathon
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bombing, something tragic happens. what's the threat? what's political? you'd rather have this conversation than the opposite conversation, wouldn't you? >> when you're inside the white house, what they are looking at are the same kinds of things we did in the bush white house. there's constant chatter. you constantly hear this talk about planned attacks. what muff crystallized in the minds of the national security apparatus, which i have to say has continued many of the anti-terror policies. >> a lot of them. >> a lot of the anti-terror thinking. there has to be incredible faith in the competence of the terrorists. there's always chatter. they always talk about killing us. >> so in this case, traced it to al zawahiri. >> that's the only thing you can push back on. if it's so intense, why wouldn't we get this information out?
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that is the counter argument, why is it public? >> we know a lot of things that are public that probably shouldn't be public. we're going to have peter king here but obviously al qaeda worked on his satellite. >> we'll get him back. >> we're going to keep trying to get peter king. coming up -- >> he turned a good idea into the global phenomenon. >> quinnipiac poll has chris christie the most popular in america but number eight in the republican party when "morning joe" returns. it's back to school time and we're talking with maria about the walmart low price guarantee. you got your list? let's go. yeah! peanut butter and jelly's a stable in our house for school lunches look at walmart's price. wow! that's great. if you find a lower advertised price they'll match it at the register.
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look at that, he is. he's 31, and look at that. brian chesky did make it onto the cover of forbes. >> that easy. >> sing the song. >> featured in the february issue for making millions by turning homes into hotels. brian is the co-founder and ceo of airnb, a marketplace for
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accommodations all over the world. people are taking note of the growing company and "new york times" thomas friedman actually featured it in a recent column writing in part this, the idea was to create a global network through which anyone anywhere could rent a spare room in their home to earn cash. in homage to its roots they call the company airnb. it's the equivalent of a major hotel claim, unlike hilton it doesn't own a single bed. the new trend it set off is the sharing economy. >> sharing economy, that's what friedman talks about. brian, fascinating story how this happened. tell us about it. >> i went to school for design, living in los angeles. i want making much money. i had $1,000 in the bank. moved up to san francisco. the landlord said our rent was $1,10050. we had a math problem. my roommate and i said what if
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we turned this into a conference. we pulled air beds out of the closet. we called it the air bed and breakfast. if you would ask me i would be here five years later, i would have said you're crazy. home by home, block by block, in 34,000 cities now, you have half a million homes -- >> how do you organize this. what was the next step. >> how does it work? i don't love the air mattress. >> design conference it works. what do you do next? >> we thought that was it. i love that idea of air bed and breakfast. we're going to london. do you have any air beds. no, we don't. people started bringing this up. we thought maybe we could originally build a website to book air beds all over the country, the world. >> people said i don't want to sleep on an air bed, i want to sleep on a real bed. pretty soon we thought, what if you could book somebody's home the way you could book a hotel anywhere around the world.
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we got a co-founder and built this -- >> look at this, hawaii, $69 a night. it's crazy. >> pretty wide range of spaces. just for example, tonight, we have 150,000 people staying in a home on airnb and 153 in castles in 42 different companies. we have a wide variety of spaces. >> let me ask you this. how do you do quality control. what if i decide i want to go to transylvania, i'm in this castle, air bed, somebody tries to stab me and eat me. how do you stop that from happening? >> the entire sharing economy -- >> it's a story. >> the currency of trust. both sides have a reputation system. when i stay with you, i review you. you review me. you can read the review. you can virtually meet the person before we stay with them. we verify everyone's identification cards, social -- >> you're building i'm sure a lot like ebay, don't buy a car from a guy unless he's got a 95,
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98% record. >> this is an idea, when we started this, people thought we were crazy. i remember when they started their company, everyone thinks they are crazy. it continues to grew. i knew from the beginning it would work because i had the experience myself. >> some people bring their own sheets. some bring their own bedding. what are the minimum guarantees. are you guaranteed you're going to get clean sheets? on top of joe's question you didn't answer, security is a concern for a lot of people when they are traveling. liability wise, legally, how do you handle that? it's a two-parter, if you can remember one of the two. >> all homes on the site are guaranteed, insured up to a million dollars to protect against theft and property damage. we have 24/7 customer support. if you were to check in and ever a problem and there aren't frequently very many problems you can call us up. this is a concept that's been
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spreading by word of mouth. fundamentally what surprises people is how well it works. >> i want everybody to be honest. would you do this? >> i've considered it more than a dozen times but i still have not. >> would you do this? answer my question. >> at this point, no. >> as a young staffer on presidential campaigns, i would much rather stay -- >> would you do it now? >> i wouldn't do it. >> would you do it? >> i would do it. >> i would do it in a second. as long as people leave me alone. as long as you get an air mattress. >> but they are not there, nicole. what? are you there with the people? >> half the time they are there. you can get your own home. >> i want privacy. >> are you guaranteed at least a private room? i don't want to sleep in a living room. >> you can get your own house all to yourself. >> i want my own house.
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>> you can get the home binge cosby had, a collection of frankie lloyd wright's house. >> i'm going to be doing that and tweeting pictures of myself in belgium on air mattresses. i love this idea. the deal of the day, $249, sleep on a yacht in san francisco harbor. >> do you do like boats, house boats. >> 1,000200 boats on our site, spanish armada. >> 31 years old, an upstart. >> are you single? >> yes. >> my sister lives in san francisco. i'll have to work on this. >> brian, thank you so much. we're going to keep our conversation going about the sharing economy. online with brian, use the #mojoe. >> let me give you advice, a very good looking man. >> discussion this afternoon,
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afternoon mojoe.msnbc.com. meekds giving fashion advice. al qaeda has been defeated. congressman peter king's satellite hookup back up. that and today's business headlines straight ahead on "morning joe." be right back. i'm tony siragusa and i'm training guys who leak a little, to guard their manhood with new depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com
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and with the fidelity cash management account debit card, you get reimbursed for all atm fees. is that it? oh, this guy, too. turn more of the money you spend into money you invest. it's everyday reinvesting for your personal economy. al qaeda has been defeated. we have satellite feed back up, west babylon, new york. i always said when al qaeda struck they would go to west babylon first and they did. we have preempted them, peter king. we're back better than ever. have you a flag to prove it, usa. so now we're finding out that
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zawahiri, al qaeda's used to be number two, now top guy, was involved in this threat. right? >> joe, i really can't get into that. all i can tell you is the evidence was real, the evidence was specific. people shouldn't be talking about who said what to whom if anything was said at all. >> if i did say zawahiri, i wouldn't be wrong, would i? >> joe, you're almost never wrong. let me just say when you took your shoe off, that's when the transmission went out on the satellite. >> so you're saying it may not have been al qaeda after all. >> the windows broke in the building here. >> you've been looking at this stuff closely. personal for you, september 11th, so many people in your district lost their lives here. of course, one of the most important people on homeland security. you claim that the threats you've seen over the the past couple of weeks have been as bad as anything you've seen in five, six, seven years. right? >> yes. the only one close to this would be the liquid explosive plot out
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of london in 2006. this one was so precise as to the nature of the attack. there were some dates given there. the sources were so credible. to me there's no doubt the attack was planned. >> all the threats overseas, no domestic -- >> no. i would not say that. it does not say where the threat is. it could be anywhere in the world. anywhere in the world. >> do you take zawahiri -- obviously almost killed him 20 times, killed members of his family. he's been on the run, been underground. are we seeing the reemergence of him in significance of al qaeda, active force? >> in many ways he's more active than bin laden was, as far as monitoring the situation. most of the work, dirty work carried out by affiliates, such as al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, al qaeda in iraq. he's more chairman of the board now. the actual most lethal force
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would be al qaeda in the arabian peninsula operating out of yemen. >> hi, congressman, nicolle wallace. >> hi, nicole. >> i have a question for you. what is the obama administration doing that gives you the most confidence and comfort. on the other side, what are they doing or not doing that gives you the most concern or pause. >> a lot of what they do physically, carrying out attacks i have great support for. they have taken out a lot of al qaeda leadership. on the other sides it's almost schizophrenic. the president is saying the war against al qaeda is almost over. we're back to a pre9/11 stage. what that does, causes concern among our allies, hard to generate support in congress. on the one hand back to pre9/11 and isolated attacks. on the other hand extended nsa more than ever before. >> i'm sorry, we've got a short amount of time. i want to make sure we get this in. >> i understand. >> we have this discussion on "meet the press" where his
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actions, very aggressive. bush and cheney-like. his words, troubling. correct? >> very troubling. absolutely, very troubling. that sends a mixed message. that's why it's hard to generate congressional and national support for what has to be done. >> peter, can you talk about the degree of difficulty involved in the clearly franchising operations of al qaeda over the past several years, the degree of difficulty attaining intelligence assets on the ground in so many areas of the world now? >> it's very difficult. it's almost like metastasizing, mercury, whatever metaphor we want to use. hard to track them down, all over the place. prior to 9/11, one location, knew where they were. we didn't do a good job following them. we knew where al qaeda core was. now it's spread, so diffuse. the internet, also often recruit local people around the world. much more difficult. that's why in many ways more difficult. al qaeda cannot carry out the
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attack of the magnitude it did on 9/11, i don't think. on the other hand it's much harder to detect where the attack is coming from and who is going to carry it out. >> congressman king, good to see you. >> i'm going to keep my shoes on, i promise. >> you're the man, joe. >> king for president, baby, 2016. >> shoes on. business before the bell now from the new york stock exchange with cnbc's kelly evans. the first look at how people are dealing with federal student loan debt. >> not a pretty picture. no surprise. people know this is a major issue. in the "wall street journal" a nice piece pointing to data from cfpb yesterday taking a look at federal student loan program, it's grown in size to half a trillion dollars in four in ten borrowers, i should say, are currently paying those loans back. some of them have forbearance or relief because they are still in school or otherwise but the default rate is better than 8%. we know the trend is worrisome.
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also, by the way, ties into the labor market. a lot of people when they come out of school with this debt are extremely limited in the jobs they can take and their ability to spend down the road. some news to ponder this august even as we look at what the senate has done to keep student loan borrowing cost down a little bit. want to mention as well, a discussion earlier about airnb. two relevant points. i tried it in budapest. >> how did that work? >> somebody try to kill you? >> no. it's interesting. the issue is it's hard to meet up with the person or find the keys to the apartment, what have you, especially when you're in a foreign country. >> did you have to live, kelly, with the people whose house you're living. >> this was an empty flat. so it depends on the arrangements. >> did you like it? would you do it again? >> absolutely. i'm intrepid in that way, i'm not sure it's for everything.
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>> how much did it cost you? >> this was hungary. in dollars i want to say it was 50 or $60. >> she was in budapest. i thought brussels. budapest. that's a horse of a different color. >> a lot more expense iive in brussels. >> yen conversation rate. >> last point on airnb, one of the investors in that company -- semiserious, ashton kutcher, and his venture capital firm who will be here at the new york stock exchange ringing the bell. laying out the red carpet. >> is ashton kutcher going to be there? >> i won't do it now. >> maria bartiromo will be interview him. that interview will be up at 3:00 p.m. >> kelly would do it. she's done it and going to do it again. that reminds me as i was bumbling around over budapest
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and belgium, one of my favorite stalin stories, we have so many favorite stalin stories, stalin had generals that were afraid to tell him, because they said, have we invade holland? yes, we have. when are we going to go after the netherlands. his generals said, soon, sir. went through the entire second world war without know holland and the netherlands are the same thing. >> up next -- very -- >> something about bread consumption. >> rating numbers are up high. geoff: i'm the kind of guy who doesn't like being sold to. the last thing i want is to feel like someone is giving me a sales pitch, especially when it comes to my investments. you want a broker you can trust. a lot of guys at the other firms seemed more focused on selling than their clients.
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that's why i stopped working at my old brokerage and became a financial consultant with charles schwab. avo: what kind of financial consultant are you looking for? talk to us today. these are sandra's "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one.
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delivering mail, medicine and packages, yet they're closing thousands of offices, slashing service and want to layoff over 100,000 workers. the postal service is recording financial losses, but not for reasons you might think. the problem? a burden no other agency or company bears. a 2006 law that drains $5 billion a year from post office revenue while the postal service is forced to overpay billions more into federal accounts. congress created this problem, and congress can fix it.
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just as new york is known for its bagels, paris is the city of baguettes but perhaps not long. apparently the french are eating less bread which has triggered a national campaign to save the baguette. of course we sent nbc's michelle kosinski to save the baguette. she joins us from paris. michelle. >> i think we're pretty close. we've eaten quite a few. these things are as french as the beret, the mime. but again you don't see those
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much anymore. would you believe every frenchman ate on average three baguettes a day. today half, half. bakers here are reminding people. put away your past argues, your pop-tarts and eat some fresh, fat-free bread. way beyond the stereotype in paris you will find baguettes in bags, armed, long lines, gigantic bites, dogs, orange pants. >> can't have dinner without a baguette in france. >> really? must have a baguette. >> must have a baguette. >> french bakers are concerned about the young generation. >> we won't bother getting down there and buying a baguette. >> bakers are riffing on the
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american "got milk?" campaign. it says in slang, did you get the bread? >> france without the baguette, what would it be? >> lost. >> now that i'm in here, i kind of want that brownie instead. >> our american girl in paris is a bread connoisseur. >> you have to be really strong. >> if you and i were eating an entire baguette every day, wouldn't we weigh 300 pounds in a month? >> no. you know what, we wouldn't eat cereal with sugar. we eat a candy bar at 4:00 in the afternoon when we were hungry. >> so this is the breakfast of french champions. >> this is the breakfast of french champions. >> do you know any french champions? >> not to worry, armand put us to work in his kitchen.
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he's a champion baker. put everything inside. >> pour it in. >> i will scrape. >> voila. so you have to touch it with passion and love, you know. >> do you ever get your feet in there, like your face? >> not long ago his was named the best bread in paris. that kind of artistry is getting harder to find, even here. when people do find it, they eat it up. >> so you're not going to let the baguette die out? >> no, definitely not. we'll keep it alive. >> would you believe that every year 10 billion of these things -- that is billion with a b -- are sold here in france. somebody is eating theta. absolutely they are still
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devouring them. bakers want to make sure they keep eating especially the traditional kind. >> thought she was going to throw it in the water. michelle kosinski. >> wonderful, michelle. we love seeing you. thanks so much. >> up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? >> i learned nothing at all. maybe one thing. a company where over seventy-five percent of store management started as hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education benefits to get a degree, maybe work in it, or be an engineer, helping walmart conserve energy. even today, when our store does well, i earn quarterly bonuses. when people look at me, i hope they see someone working their way up. vo: opportunity, that's the real walmart. a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem,
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a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a stroke.
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get medical help right away if you develop any signs or symptoms of bleeding, like unusual bruising or tingling. you may have a higher risk of bleeding if you take xarelto® with aspirin products, nsaids or blood thinners. talk to your doctor before taking xarelto® if you currently have abnormal bleeding. xarelto® can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. you are likely to bruise more easily on xarelto®, and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. tell your doctors you are taking xarelto® before any planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions, such as kidney, liver or bleeding problems. ready to change your routine? ask your doctor about once-a-day xarelto®. for more information including cost support options, call 1-888-xarelto or visit goxarelto.com. when she's happy, she writes about bunnies. when she's sad, she writes about goblins. [ balloon pops, goblin growling ] she wrote a lot about goblins
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after getting burned in the market. but she found someone to talk to and gained the confidence to start investing again. ♪ and that's what you call a storybook ending. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for over 18 years, we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. welcome back.
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20 seconds. mika. >> oh, my lord, going to "the view." are you nervous? >> always nervous on "the view." >> castle in scotland, airnb. >> love it. mike. >> boston globe sales, good move. >> get the new book. >> see you tomorrow. >> here is chuck. that was fast, joe. nicely done a. extremely high threat level. that's how the state department is describing the situation in yemen. all u.s. citizens are being ordered to evacuate immediately. we'll have the latest on developing reaction to potential dangers across the middle east and africa at the start of the show. with another major star suspended for using performance enhancing drugs, what's the future look like for american pastime. hear what former negro league had to say. they happened to be at the white house. it was a coincidence but stron

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Morning Joe
MSNBC August 6, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

TOPIC FREQUENCY Washington 36, Us 24, Jeff Bezos 16, Clinton 15, Chris Christie 13, America 12, Joe 11, Tina 10, Angie 9, Romney 8, John Henry 8, Huffington 8, New York 8, Nbc 8, Mika 8, Graham 8, Peter King 7, Anthony Weiner 7, Garth 7, Mike Barnicle 7
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